The best way to accomplish big things while keeping life balance is by creating rituals. All the greats had some form of a ritual in order to produce work and keep (somewhat) sane. Whether or not realize you it, you have rituals in place now. Some help you and some are probably setting you back.

Daily Rituals is a collection of the world’s best writers, artists, and creators daily habits. It’s “how they create (and avoid creating) their creations.” I keep this book nearby for finding new ideas and as a reminder that I’m not alone in the struggle to make time to create.

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When I opened my eyes this morning, I looked over at the corner of the room and took a deep breath. It was the corner near the fireplace, where for the last two weeks, I sat, crossed my legs, and closed my eyes for twenty minutes of mindful meditation.

Now, some people may still consider meditation as a strictly spiritual practice. Something reserved for chakra juggling mystics after new moon parties. However, tons of scientific research credit meditation and mindfulness with reducing anxiety, improving cognition, and decreasing distraction.

In a world where external stimuli chase us down like an avalanche, a mindfulness practice can be a beacon in the snow storm.

Craving the benefits of this so-called bicep curl for the brain, I had enthusiastically committed myself to a 30-day mindful meditation challenge. This morning would have been day 18.

I sat in my corner, felt the heat of the fireplace and wiped the sleep from my eyes. Eager to begin my cerebral scrub down, I set the timer. That’s when it hit me—yesterday came and went, and I didn’t meditate.

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I watched the movie, Lucy, the other night.

Storyline: Girl gets pumped full of nootropic, cognitive enhancers, only a million times stronger, and her brain capacity goes through the roof.

Soon, she’s a kung-fu master catching bullets with her teeth while memorizing encyclopedias in different languages.

Lucy hits her cerebral “peak” and, as motivational speakers say, starts “firing on all cylinders.” At one point, Lucy says, “I’ve accessed 28% of my cerebral capacity. I can feel every living thing.”

Ugh… I don’t want to be like Lucy. I want to use less of my brain.

In the film, they talk about how we only use about 10% of our brain. Other articles claim this isn’t true, and that people use 90% of the brain’s capacity.

It doesn’t matter to me. 10% or 90%, it’s still too much.

I want to think less and notice more.

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